Lazors

As much as I like to criticize action games for lack of content, I have to admit, I enjoy minimalistic puzzles. It seems that the slower the pacing of the game, the less content it requires to be fun. Lazors is a perfect example of a game that only has parts, required for its correct functioning and nothing else. Well, besides great graphics. Lazors operates on a single, simplistic idea. Frankly, I can’t even tell if it’s an original idea or not, since it seems too obvious for no one to come up with it earlier – but I never noticed a game like this before. Well, whatever the case, it doesn’t stop Lazors from being a fun, creative puzzle with lots of levels and really impressive graphics, especially if you count the fact that it’s free.

The game actually feels great to play, never minding the actual content and it’s been quite a long time since I’ve had such a smooth experience. For an icing on the cake, the game is also completely free

Lazors levels consist of several square tiles in various patterns and several blocks of different properties, set on them. Some of the blocks are movable while others are not. Your task is always the same: make the laser beams that are emitting from various parts of the level, to pass through the incisions in-between tiles. The blocks that are available for you, help you in this task. There are several kinds of blocks and how they influence the laser beam. The most usual block reflects the beam from its surface under the same angle, like a mirror. Next is the block that completely absorbs laser and that is usually serve as an obstacle. Finally, there is a transparent block that splits the laser beam in two, one part getting reflected just like from a standard block and other passing straight through the block without any alterations. In each level you get a certain number of certain blocks, so your only task is to set them on their positions, which isn’t nearly as easy as it seems. Just like all the brilliant puzzles, Lazors has a very simple concept and really primitive level structure, only being several tiles wide, most of the time, yet it has an infinitely deep level of complexity, if it needs to. There are tons of levels, sorted out in packs, passing which will certainly take a great time. All the time, you’re treated to moderate, but impressive visual effects and clean textures. The game actually feels great to play, never minding the actual content and it’s been quite a long time since I’ve had such a smooth experience. For an icing on the cake, the game is also completely free and I never actually noticed anything resembling an add or an in-game store, although I guess you could purchase hints – but they are absolutely unnecessary, if you are ready to strangle a couple of your neurons, seeking a solution for puzzles that eventually get pretty complicated. I guess, the only real “problem” I can think of, for this game, is that there could be a lot more mechanics, for it to become a nearly perfect puzzle. But don’t listen to that, I just need an excuse to not give it five stars. Really, it’s a great game.

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